Posted by Muneeza Realty Group on 1/13/2018

For the generation that grew up at the height of the subprime mortgage crisis, buying a home is a scary concept. Many young people in the 18-34 age range are dealing with high rent, a poor job market, unpaid internships, and student loans the size of a home loan. Yet, others are finding their footing and realizing that owning a home is advantageous in the long run. If you're thinking of delving into the world of home ownership for the first time here's a crash course in Home Buying 101.

Figure out your finances

You should be an expert at you and your significant other's personal finances if you are thinking about buying a home. The first thing to look at is your income and expenditures. Put the following information in a spreadsheet:
  • Total monthly income
  • Total monthly expenditures (bills, gas, food, etc.)
  • Total monthly savings
  • Total savings and assets
  • Credit and FICO score (request both of these online)
When crunching these numbers you should (hopefully) find that your income is higher than your expenditures and your savings should account for most of the difference. If your savings is lower than it should be, you either missed something on the expenditures list or you are spending more than you should be if you want to buy a home. Down Payments Down payments on a home, post-financial crisis, range from anywhere between 0-25 percent of the price of the home, 20 being the median. A down payment ideally shouldn't break your savings in case you have any unforeseen expenses once you buy your home. Moving is time-consuming and can be pricey, so you'll need to account for this in your finances.

Lock Down Your Financing

There are several types of mortgages that you'll need to choose from, and you'll want to learn about fixed and adjustable mortgage rates. This information should be informed by your long-term plans. Are you looking for your first home or your forever home? If you don't plan on fully paying off the home you might look for a low, adjustable rate while you earn money. But if you want to stay in your home until it's paid off, a fixed rate might be better for you.

Finding and buying your home

Once you've determined your price range, start thinking about things like location and the kind of home you can afford. If you're handy with tools and have the time, it might be in your best interest to buy a home than needs some work at a lower cost. If you'd rather put in more hours at work, go with the home that needs less work and save money that way. Depending on whether or not you're in a buyer's market or a seller's market, the ball can be in your court or the seller's. In a seller's market, which is more likely today in many parts of the country, the seller will have more leverage in negotiations, including closing dates and move-out dates. Due to high competition, you should also be prepared to miss out on some offers. But be patient, and you should find the home you're looking for.  





Posted by Muneeza Realty Group on 10/1/2016

There's no denying the truth – the real estate market can be complicated. As such, regardless of whether you're a first-time or experienced homebuyer, you'll want to do everything you can to prepare for the process of purchasing a new residence. So what does it take to ensure you can land your dream home in any real estate segment? Here are three tips for both first-time and experienced homebuyers: 1. Understand the Speed of the Real Estate Market. A newly listed residence may sell only a few hours after it reaches the real estate market. Thus, you'll want to stay on top of houses as they become available in cities and towns where you'd like to relocate; otherwise, you risk missing out on what could be your perfect residence. Remember, the real estate market moves fast, and homebuyers who hesitate likely will struggle to score their dream homes. To accelerate the homebuying process, you'll want to get pre-approved for a mortgage. By doing so, you can submit an offer without having to commit significant time and resources to secure financing for your dream home down the line. Also, if you're interested in a home and feel comfortable with a residence, don't wait too long before you submit an offer. Because if you do, you could lose your dream home to another homebuyer. 2. View Any Home Purchase as an Investment. Although you have no plans to purchase a home and sell it at a later date, the future remains unpredictable. As a result, you should view any home you check out as a long-term investment and try to find a residence that you believe will increase in value. Typically, what you pay for a home is unlikely to represent your residence's total value in five or 10 years. But homebuyers who view a home purchase as an investment will understand that a residence's value will fluctuate over time and dedicate the time and resources to maximize a home's value, too. Look beyond a home itself to determine whether you are comfortable with a residence as a long-term investment. For instance, if you buy a newly constructed home in an up-and-coming area, the residence's value may rise quickly in the foreseeable future. On the other hand, if you purchase a "fixer-upper," aka a home in need of significant repairs, you may need to consider setting extra money aside to complete home improvement projects to help optimize this residence's value. 3. Work with an Experienced Real Estate Agent. Although you've done plenty of research about the housing market, it never hurts to have an experienced real estate agent at your disposal. A real estate agent is happy to assist you during every step of the homebuying process. That way, if you encounter any homebuying hurdles, this real estate professional can help you overcome these challenges without delay. Employ a real estate agent who possesses comprehensive industry experience and who makes you feel comfortable and confident as you explore the real estate market. And ultimately, your real estate agent should be able to help you find your dream home.







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